Not So Super (Bowl) in the City.

Ok, I will start this post with the requisite caveat: I really do not care for American pro football. This is noteworthy because I love sports. Really. I can get excited about just about any athletic competition. To name just a few, I can get psyched for golf, track & field, cricket, gymnastics, swimming, lacrosse, soccer, polo, rugby, basketball… I love them all. But I just cannot get on board with football. And I promise I have tried.

When I think of football, especially the NFL, I think of murder, child abuse, spousal abuse, misogyny, cheating, rapists, medical irresponsibility, racism, unfair labor practices, and abusive treatment of labor (Here is what are considered the “worst” crimes committed by NFL players.) On top of this, in an average game that lasts for three hours, there is approximately 11 minutes of play.

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So, yeah, this is not a game I like.

A couple of years ago, the San Francisco 49ers moved from San Francisco to Santa Clara. The how and why of this are not all that interesting (or surprising): it is all about the $. And of course, anyone who ever spent much time at Candlestick knows that was its own set of circumstances. Interestingly, since the move the 49ers have gotten progressively shittier. Again, this is not something I care much about since I don’t really watch football.

Why, then, am I spending any time at all writing about football (especially when I am inundated with absolutely stunning basketball at the pro and college level in the men’s and women’s game all around me)? Because, for reasons that are also not so interesting or surprising, San Francisco bid for the 50th Super Bowl at some point and they won the bid. Regardless of the fact that San Francisco is no longer home to an NFL team. So, they got the rights to host the Super Bowl and I am sure there are more economic interests and manipulators in play here than I could ever imagine (or want to). The word from the city is that it is going to be some sort of windfall for local businesses. Thus far that has not born out at all, but the game is a week a way. The Mayor was all keyed up to present the best of SF and so he decided he had better hide solve the homeless “problem“, so he shipped them out. #compassionate

And all of this for the Super Bowl City.

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Super Bowl City has made a key area of our city completely inaccessible for a period of three weeks. Thankfully, I will probably be able to avoid this situation in my day-to-day. However, there are thousands who will not.

This was a terrible idea for San Francisco. When cities like London, Paris, Rio, Beijing, even Los Angeles, host events like this they are able to sustain the regular functions of the city – albeit with greater crowds, but those are not necessarily a negative if the people who live in the city can manage to continue living. Those cities are big enough in land area that they can offer reasonable and feasible workarounds. This is not the case in a geographically tiny city like San Francisco. This is a 49 square mile area with no feasible workarounds.

As I stood in line waiting for a ferry I didn’t even know was running because the ferry I intended to catch had left  early because it was at capacity, I was speaking with a lovely older lady who had had to walk 15 minutes out of her way to get to the ferry on her way home from the airport. She too missed the boat. Another woman lives across from Pier 70 where most of the big shows will be, is going to be unable to access her home by car and cannot get her daughter to school unless she takes the F-Market, which will take her more than an hour. To say we felt frustrated would be a vast understatement.

Really, if Santa Clara is good enough for the football players, how can it not be good enough for the football fans?

In spite of all the gross feelings I have about this situation in SF, I would be terribly remiss to not mention the people working in and around Super Bowl City. Every single person I have encountered, regardless of my state of duress, frustration, or confusion, has been unbelievably kind, patient, informative and helpful. Seriously, these people are showing the very best of our city, and they deserve so much more of a shout out than a temporary job. My mom told me she was talking to a worker down there who was telling her she was so grateful for the work. It kills me that our city cannot provide permanent work for these people, but that is an economics lesson for another time.

For now, if you are trying to get anywhere stay away from Super Bowl City. If you are excited about the events of the next few weeks, then enjoy. Oh, and pro tip: if you need to get from Bart to the Ferry Building for any sort of transportation situation, try going up and over Embarcadero 2.

Good luck.

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